One Saturday a month, join Miss Julie to create your own masterpieces! In these workshops, kids can paint like a famous artist, learn about other cultures, celebrate different holidays, and so much more - each workshop offers something different!

Read more about the history behind Dia de los Muertos HERE.

The Day of the Dead (Día de Muertos or Día de los Muertos) is a holiday traditionally celebrated on November 1 and 2, though other days, such as October 31 or November 6, may be included depending on the locality. It largely originated in Mexico where it is mostly observed, but also in other places. Although associated with the Western Christian Allhallowtide observances of All Hallow's Eve, All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day, it has a much less solemn tone and is portrayed as a holiday of joyful celebration rather than mourning. The multi-day holiday involves family and friends gathering to pay respects and to remember friends and family members who have died. These celebrations can take a humorous tone, as celebrants remember funny events and anecdotes about the departed. Traditions connected with the holiday include honoring the deceased using calaveras and Aztec marigold flowers known as cempazúchitl, building home altars called "ofrendas" with the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these items as gifts for the deceased. The celebration is not solely focused on the dead, as it is also common to give gifts to friends such as candy sugar skulls, to share traditional pan de muerto with family and friends.

Kids' Saturday Workshop - Dia de los Muertos - October 29 Image